Product Code:
E-DVD0050TCW

E-DVD Attacking 1.d4 Repertoire for White with IM Robert Ris

Over 10 hours of high-quality video training, jampacked into 36 chapters… Robert goes over ALL the main lines of the 1.d4 opening, starting from the complicated KID to the fearsome Nimzo-Indian to the mysterious Tarrasch.
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Product Description

Want to learn the 1.d4? That’s when things get interesting.

Whether you go for instant pawn tensions like in the Queen’s Gambit or for a more subtle long-term play like in the Catalan…

You have the choice to take the game almost any way you want to.

Flexibility is the name of the 1.d4 game, my friend.

Once you enter through that door, you need to be ready to tackle whatever your opponent comes up with and steer the game in the direction that suits you best.

However, if you think “Cool, sounds exciting. Let’s try it in my next tournament!”, here’s my advice: PLEASE DO NOT.

Ever seen those stunt commercials where they warn you ‘not to try it at home’? I will tell you never to try 1.d4, ever, in a real game unless you are a “seasoned professional”.

At least not until you have gone through IM Robert Ris’ latest course Attacking 1.d4 for White, launched smokin’ hot today and waiting for you to grab your copy as fast as you can.

Over 10.5 hours of high-quality video training, jampacked into 36 chapters… Robert goes over ALL the main lines of the 1.d4 opening, starting from the complicated KID to the fearsome Nimzo-Indian to the mysterious Tarrasch.

Want to learn 1.d4 in one complete package?

This is it, my friend.

Here’s what you would learn:

  • Benko overrun. Black tries to trick you by offering the a-pawn sacrifice? Don’t fall for it. Let Robert show you what to do instead. Turn your knight into a monster and exploit your queenside advantage right away.
  • Queenside fianchetto. Black grabs the a8-h1 diagonal, occupying control of the light squares. Is Qc2 the right way to play this position? Robert says yes, especially since you are protecting the e4-pawn against that bishop’s capture.
  • QGA trap for Black. Believe it or not, Black’s biggest concern always turns out to be saving the c-pawn. Don’t be like most White players who try to recapture it right away—let White obsess over it while you set your own traps.
  • Destroy Dutch with this move. You can harass Black’s ambitious f-pawn move with a simple 2.Bg5! Provoke Black to push those king’s pawns forward, trying to snare your bishop. Who cares? You got his king on the hook by now. Learn how…
  • Oddly positioned knight. Black goes off the track and ends up placing his king’s knight on the queen’s knight’s square…a classic problem in the Budapest Gambit! Black will fall behind in tempo and that’s when you strike. More in Chapter 13.

Let’s get started!

Outline:
CHAPTER 1 Introduction
CHAPTER 2 KID & GI 3.h4 part I Intro
CHAPTER 3 KID & GI 3.h4 part II Benko Setup
CHAPTER 4 KID & GI 3.h4 part III Ben-Oni Setup
CHAPTER 5 KID & GI 3.h4 part IV Nc6 Setup
CHAPTER 6 KID & GI 3.h4 part V Grunfeld
CHAPTER 7 KID & GI 3.h4 part VI KID
CHAPTER 8 Benoni Intro (and Snake Benoni)
CHAPTER 9 Benoni Four Pawns Attack
CHAPTER 10 Czech Benoni
CHAPTER 11 Queens Fianchetto
CHAPTER 12 Benko Gambit 5.Nc3
CHAPTER 13 Budapest Gambit
CHAPTER 14 Nimzo f3 part I (Intro + 4…0-0)
CHAPTER 15 Nimzo f3 part II (6…c6)
CHAPTER 16 Nimzo f3 part III (ML exd5)
CHAPTER 17 Nimzo f3 part IV (ML 8…f5)
CHAPTER 18 Nimzo f3 part V (ML 8…Qa5 alternatives)
CHAPTER 19 Nimzo f3 part VI (ML 8…Qa5 9.e4 Ne7)
CHAPTER 20 Nimzo f3 part VII (ML 5…Be7)
CHAPTER 21 Nimzo f3 part VIII (4…c5)
CHAPTER 22 QGD part I Main Line
CHAPTER 23 QGD part II (3…Be7)
CHAPTER 24 QGA part I (4.Nc3 a6)
CHAPTER 25 QGA part II Transposition Vienna
CHAPTER 26 Slav part I Botvinnik Variation
CHAPTER 27 Slav part II Anti-Moscow
CHAPTER 28 Slav part III Cambridge Springs
CHAPTER 29 Slav part IV Chebanenko
CHAPTER 30 Slav part V Geller Gambit
CHAPTER 31 Slav part VI Nooteboom Variation
CHAPTER 32 Tarrasch
CHAPTER 33 Dutch 2.Bg5
CHAPTER 34 2…Nc6, 2…Bf5 & 2…c5
CHAPTER 35 Albin Counter-Gambit
CHAPTER 36 1…e6 English Defense & Other 2nd moves for Black

Product Specifications
More Information
ISBN Does not apply
Host IM Robert Ris
Delivery Time Immediate Delivery
Popular Collections The Chess World
Publication Date Jan 6, 2022
Runtime 10 Hours 43 Minutes
Hardware Requirements Works on both Windows and Mac-based Computers
Downloadable Item


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Requirements

Works on both Windows and Mac-based Computers

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